25 Module 2 Introduction

Welcome to Module Two!

As we journey into our next Module, we learn about three more areas that help us to understand the cultures we are studying – and more about ourselves, too!

  • Gender and Sexuality

    Explore the ways in which culture shapes sex/gender and sexuality. Think about the range of possible ways of constructing gender and sexuality by learning about examples from different cultures, including small-scale societies.

  • Race and Ethnicity

    Anthropologists assert that race is a socially constructed concept. In this chapter, think about how ethnicity is different from race, how ethnic groups are different from racial groups, and what is meant by symbolic ethnicity and pan-ethnicity. Consider the history of immigration to the United States, and how different waves of immigrant groups have been perceived as racially different and have shifted popular understandings of “race.” Lastly, think about how the racial and ethnic compositions of professional sports have shifted over time and how those shifts resulted from changing social and cultural circumstances that drew new groups into sports.

  • Religion

    Consider the significance of religion in human cultures, and the theories used to explain the importance of supernatural beliefs in human communities. Examine the four elements of religion (cosmology, belief in the supernatural, rules of behavior, and rituals) and how each element contributes to religious practices. Learn more about rites of passage, rites of intensification, rites of revitalization, and the purpose of each type of ritual.

Where do you want to go?!

Our Virtual Field Trips continue to offer you new cultures to “visit.” As with the previous field trip, it consists of a visit to online websites and articles – but this one has a new twist…as you write up your “Field Trip Essay” – where you describe, analyze, and reflect on what you have learned – you will also be asked to compare this culture and topic with the one you studied in your first Field Trip (or another option from Field Trip One).

This is part of the holistic and comparative approach used by anthropologists: As we see similarities between cultures, we also see what makes each culture unique. See the options below.

See the Module 1 Introduction web page for the Virtual Field Trip Rubric.


Module 2 Assignments

Reading

Use the Study Guides as you read the chapters to help you focus on important terms, concepts, people, and places. This will also help you prepare for the quizzes in this module.


Study Guides and Quizzes

There is a 15 question quiz for each chapter. You can find these in the Quizzes tool.


Virtual Field Trip – Where do you want to go?

Submit your essay to the Assignments tool, and paste the test of your essay into the Discussion tool to share with your fellow students.

Read the Essays posted by your peers, and post a comment (75 words each) to two peers.  This will be done the week after you have posted your own Field Trip Essay.

See complete Instructions on the Virtual Field Trip pages.


Research Project – Follow Your Own Path

In this module you will submit your Semester Research Project Study Proposal.

The Semester Research Project Study Proposal is your first step in the Semester Research Project assignment. This is your opportunity to explore a specific non-Western small group or indigenous culture of your choice more deeply.

You are encouraged to “follow your own path” in research!

Semester Research Project Study Proposal

For this assignment, you will create a Semester Research Project Study Proposal: A 150-word, one to two paragraph overview of your ideas, describing the culture and topic you would like to investigate, two anthropological concepts (with brief definitions or explanations, citing our text) that will guide you in your research and analysis, and one outside source you can use in your research (include internal citation). Both sources (textbook and outside source) should be listed in the Bibliography.

This is a 150-word, one to two paragraph overview of your ideas, describing:

  • the culture you want to learn about
  • the topic you would like to investigate

Your proposal should include:

  • two anthropological concepts (with brief definitions or explanations, citing our text) that will guide you in your research and analysis, and
  • one outside source you can use in your research (include internal citation).
  • bibliography listing both sources, and any others you choose to use.

Be sure to read the Semester Research Project page for complete instructions.

License

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Cultural Anthropology by Lumen Learning is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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