124 Module Overview

In this module, you will read a chapter in your online text, then view a TED talk , decide on one of two assigned topics, write your argument, read it to another person, and finally, submit it to me in the SafeAssign drop box.  This particular assignment is perhaps the most typical of the kind of essay you will be asked to write in college classes.  It is the standard “five paragraph” essay, requiring you to support a thesis with logical evidence, and also consider the opposite side of the argument.  ***ALSO, because I want this to be typical of work you would turn in for any class, THIS time you will be graded on grammar, usage, sentence structure, spelling, etc.  LOOK back at your writing labs to see the areas you need to really watch.  EVERYONE should use the spellcheck feature for this and any following assignments–it will catch most of your spelling errors.  AND  have someone proofread for you–we ALL need another person to check our writing, since we rarely see our own errors.

1.  Read in online text “Writing for Success: Argument” in the Argument/Persuasion chapter

2.  View the TED talk in the link below.

3. Respond to both discussions.  Both deal with as aspect of the texting issue.

4.  Examine the assignment choices below:  Two opposing points of view.

5. Engage in some prewriting activity to help you decide which side of the argument you want to support. (See my prewriting notes–pros and cons of texting–below.

6.  Review the checklists of important points below (taken from the online text)

7.  Develop an outline for your 5 paragraph essay.

1. Intro.

2.  First argument in support of your position.

3.  Second argument in support of your position.

4.  Paragraph dealing with and refuting an opposing point of view.

5.  Summary and conclusion.

 The Structure of an Argumentative Essay

The following five features make up the structure of an argumentative essay:

    1. Introduction and thesis
    2. Opposing and qualifying ideas
    3. Strong evidence in support of claim
    4. Style and tone of language
    5. A compelling conclusion

Developing Sound Arguments

Use the following checklist to develop sound arguments in your essay:

      • An engaging introduction
      • A reasonable, specific thesis that is able to be supported by evidence
      • A varied range of evidence from credible sources
      • Respectful acknowledgement and explanation of opposing ideas
      • A style and tone of language that is appropriate for the subject and audience
      • Acknowledgement of the argument’s limits
      • A conclusion that will adequately summarize the essay and reinforce the thesis

 

PREWRITING: -write down thoughts/ideas as they occur to you about texting–maybe review some of your own texts for examples.

HERE IS MY OWN LIST OF PREWRITING THOUGHTS:

MY autocorrect is so screwy–results in too many miscommunications–e.g. DEMON for DEVIN

Can make me seem illiterate–depends on audience–e.g. U R CRAZee…it’s embarrassing if people think I’m illiterate, since I’m an English professor.

Easier than leaving phone messages and I can respond when I choose

Works when I don’t have wireless Internet access

Can be horrifying–e.g. LOL meanining laugh out loud or lots of love…..

Lets people off the hook instead of confronting in person or on phone–both plus and minus

Definitely depends on audience for understanding –NOT understanding can lead to hurt feelings or angry arguments!

I wouldn’t use txtng with my college president or my grandfather–wrong audience

Assignment Choices for Essay:

 1.  TED Talk is titled “Texting is Killing Language”  Argue that this is true.  Use specific personal examples or anecdotes, research expert opinion, and be sure to deal with the opposite side of the argument.  With an introduction and conclusion this becomes the standard five paragraph essay required in many college courses.

OR–  DO EITHER 1 OR 2–NOT BOTH

2.  In the above TED talk, the speaker says that “texting is a linguistic miracle.”  Argue that his position is true.  Use specific personal examples or anecdotes, include points made in the TED talk for your expert opinion, and deal with the opposite side of the argument.  With an introduction and conclusion, this becomes the standard five paragraph essay assigned in many college courses.

EDITING CHECKLIST:  READ YOUR ESSAY TO SOMEONE ELSE–THIS CAN BE ANYONE YOU TRUST TO LISTEN CAREFULLY AND MAKE HELPFUL COMMENTS.  

Ask your listener to look for the following and jot down a few notes to discuss with you.

What is the author’s thesis?
What key points does the author use to argue the thesis?
How does the author use reasoning, research and/or examples to affirm her viewpoint?
How does the author attempt to refute opposing arguments?

Did this argument convince you or leave you with too many questions?

 

LOOK FOR THE WRITING LAB ASSIGNMENTS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE LEARNING MODULES.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Enhanced College Writing by Lumen Learning is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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