50 Block formats for correspondence

The most important thing to remember with written correspondence is to be consistent: indent all paragraphs or block all paragraphs. But this document will review the major formats for correspondence.

Block format (everything lines up on the left margin):

(RETURN ADDRESS)

123 Smith Street

Plattsburgh, N.Y. 12901

(DATE)

Feb. 21, 2006

(INSIDE ADDRESS)

Mr. Milton Bradley

President

Johnson Packaging Company

4242 Jones Road

Canton, N.Y. 13084

(SALUTATION)

Dear Mr. Bradley:

(BODY- don’t indent paragraphs- skip lines between paragraphs)

I am writing….

Please….

(Signature line)

Yours truly,

Jeff Meyers

Modified block:

123 Smith Street

Plattsburgh, N.Y. 12901

Feb. 21, 2006

Mr. Milton Bradley

President

Johnson Packaging Company

4242 Jones Road

Canton, N.Y. 13084

Dear Mr. Bradley:

(Don’t indent paragraphs- skip lines between paragraphs)

Yours truly,

Jeff Meyers

The semi block format is similar to modified block except that paragraphs are indented and it is optional to skip lines between paragraphs- do so consistently if you want to spread info out more on a page.

The simplified letter can use any of the block formats, but it does not include the Greeting. Instead, it has a subject line identifying the topic of the letter. It is used when you don’t know the name of a person you are writing to. It’s sometimes better than using “Dear Sir or Madam:” or “To Whom it May Concern.”

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